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. >> when marion came to washington d.c., he came into a sleepy southern town. >> white business, white political power, white everything ruled the city. >> the city was like a plantation. we didn't have elections. no mayor, no city council. we couldn't vote. congress controlled d.c. >> control of washington d.c. was about one person, that's representative john mcmillan of south carolina. he was a racist. and so that guided all of his politics. he used the district in ways that were designed to maintain the segregation, keep black folks down. >> they'd all been told, we black people will never vote. politics is white people's business. we should never agitate white people. if they tell us to get off the street, get the hell off the street! >> barry: politically, we were nowhere. we were just backward. people weren't used to registering to vote because they couldn't vote for anything. it was awful. and that makes anybody want to get angry. and not only make you angry, make you want to do something about it. it was time for me, i think, to be here. >> woman: [screaming at police] >> barry
to come to washington. there will be those that will miscast this as some great social event. but let us remember 50 years ago some came to washington having rode the back of buses. some came to washington that couldn't stop and buy a cup of coffee until they got across the mason dixon line. some came to washington sleeping in their cars because they couldn't rent a motel room. some came to washington never having had the privilege to vote. some came having seen their friends shed blood. but they came to washington so we could come today in a different time and a different place and we owe them for what we have today. i et a man not long ago, tell it often, he says i'm african american but i don't understand all this civil rights marching you're talking about, reverend al. i've accomplished, i've achieved. look at my resume. i went to the best schools. i'm a member of the right clubs. i had the right people read my resume. civil rights didn't write my resume. i looked at his resume. i said, you're right. civil rights didn't write your resume. but civil rights made somebody ead your resum
to make the first march on washington and i never really got over that until president obama said please lead us in the invocation, and that was in january of this year. thank you reverend sharpton and others for asking me to lend a few words to this most precious gatheri gathering as i look out at the crowd, i find myself saying, what are we doing today? where have we come from? what has been accomplished and where do we go from this point forwa forward? i think of one theme that has been played over and over in the past few months and it's one that bring great controversy. stand your ground. and we can think of standing your ground in the negative, but i ask you today to flip that coin and make stand your ground a positive ring for all of us who believe in freedom and justice and equality, that we stand firm on the ground that we have already made and be sure that nothing is taken away from us because there are efforts to turn back the clock of freedom. and i ask you today will you allow that to happen? take the words "stand your ground" in a positive sense. stand your ground in terms
our march on washington conversation series, as a father and son reflect on what that event has young people were found with courage and some often radical symptoms, i wouldn't have the >> ifill: and we close with the story of army staff sergeant ty michael carter, who received the nation's highest military honor today for his bravery druing the war on afghanistan. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the united states insisted today it is "undeniable" that syria's rulers gassed their own people last week, just outside damascus. that was coupled with new warnings of repercussions yet to opportun
at the 1963 march on washington for jobs on freedom. "he has got the whole world in his hands. >> let us listen please to the words of this song and understand that in the heart of our creator, every soul has the same value and should be valued equally. thank you very much for the opportunity to sing for you. ♪ he's got the whole world in his hands. he's got the whole wide world in his hands. he's got the whole world in his hands. he's got the whole world in his hands. [singing "he's got the whole ♪orld in his hands"] ♪ [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, the speaker of the united states house of representatives, the honorable john boehner. >> how about a round of applause? [applause] let me thank my colleagues for their testimonials and express my gratitude to all the members of staff of the congressional black caucus in their assistance planning this ceremony. we have many guests. the mayor is here. our attorney general is here. we want to welcome all of you. right now, i have the distinct honor of introducing a great patriot, the recipient of the presidential medal of freedom, a
. ♪ [applause] >> thank you. 50 years ago, they did not take a bus outing to come to washington. there will be those that will miscast this as some great social event. but let us remember 50 years ago some came to washington having rode the back of buses. some came to washington that couldn't stop and buy a cup of coffee until they got across the mason dixon line. some came to washington sleeping in their cars because they couldn't rent a motel room. some came to washington never having had the privilege to vote. some came having seen their friends shed blood. but they came to washington so we could come today in a different time and a different place and we owe them for what we have today. [applause] i met a man not long ago, i tell it often, he says i'm african american but i don't understand all this civil rights marching you're talking about, reverend al. i've accomplished, i've achieved. look at my resume. i went to the best schools. i'm a member of the right clubs. i had the right people read my resume. civil rights didn't write my resume. i looked at his resume. i said, y
think about the march on washington they only think about the dream speech and that part of the speech. they don't think about anything else and you are right. he said a lot harsher things than anyone talked about. this is including the absence of women on the stage on purpose. they even missed the dream part of the speech. they were looking so much for the violence that they did not see it. i'm wondering how they thought, with anyen there, notice that they've missed the story. >> i want to address media coverage on the march on washington and i remember the three major networks were there. withoutered it interruption and they broadcasted it to europe. "the washington post" assign more than 60 reporters to cover that story. it was really big news. a congressman, you said that the civil rights movement without the media would be like a bird without wings. what did you mean? >> i meant that. >> i know you did, but tell us what you meant. without the media, especially in the american south, without reporters, without the photographer, without the cameras to bring the message .nto the livi
challenging moments of diplomacy, the u.s. and russia held high-level meetings in washington. margaret warner recaps today's talks. >> brown: four out of ten street lights don't work and it takes an hour on average for detroit police to respond to 9-1-1 calls. hari sreenivasan looks at the motor city's battle amid bankruptcy. >> detroiters are so used to bad news, and they are so used to things not really breaking our way, and they're used to getting up the next morning and going, "well, i can't stop, i've got to keep going, i've got to keep trying." >> woodruff: david brooks and ruth marcus analyze the week's news. >> brown: and yes, those are goats in that graveyard. more than a hundred of them. kwame holman tells us what they're doing in this historic washington, d.c., cemetery. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour h been provided by: >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> an
on washington remains a seminal moment in american history. tonight, we kick off a series of discussions to mark the anniversary. >> we've forgotten most of the >> brown: and remembering a stalwart of american political journalism. we look back at the career of the long-time reporter, columnist and t.v. commentator, jack germond. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> supported by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation. committed to building a more just, verdant and peaceful world. more information at macfound.org >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. >> brown: the political crisis in egypt reached a new turning point today. security forces made good on a pledge to sweep away sit-ins that sprang up after the military ousted president mohammed morsi in late june. the country's health ministry reported at least 235 civilians and 4
in the 1963 march on washington remember the events of that day in a discussion hosted by the martin luther king, jr. memorial library in washington, d.c. this is an hour 30 minutes. >> when our archivist suggested that i conduct oral histories with people that attended the march, i jumped at the opportunity to hear firsthand accounts of the days that i, like many of you, had only known about in books, photos and media reflections. i was curious about literal and other journeys that people took to get to the lincoln memorial on that hot august day in 1963. we put out a call for people it into the march to be interviewed and the panelists here today were the first to answer that call. it is important to note that this is the beginning of an ongoing project and derek and our collection not only oral histories but also memorabilia and other artifacts from the march to the washingtonian the community archive. two of the panelists, peter bailey and doctor ella kelly were right under my nose as their regular attendees to the black studies lecture series that takes place in the black study center
anniversary of the march on washington. wasn't it exciting to see the enthusiasm and the film of the people of the day? who could have expected so many of us would be here who had ties to all that was owing on? who could suspect that we would all be with john lewis? [applause] attorney general, mr. mayor, you honor us with your presence. .he fierce urgency of now words rang out across the national mall, the call echoed in households across america. the summons ignited a movement to make real the promise of democracy. of course everyone knows the "i had a dream" speech, but the fierce urgency of now part of it was not only an inspiration, it was a motivation to act. was not the first time dr. martin luther king jr. urged fellow travelers to reject the status quo, to in his words at the march, refuse to take the tranquilizing drug of gradualism. seven years early now to trim of in francisco, my hometown, 1956, dr. king delivered the same message to the delegates of the naacp convention. --said "now i realize those all over are telling us we must slow up, he said, but we cannot afford this slo
.e.o. of the "washington post's" parent company, donald graham. >> warner: "i am the shooter," declared army major nidal hasan at the start of his trial in an attack that killed 13 at fort hood, texas. we look at today's opening arguments and early testimony. >> ifill: the pentagon eased financial pain for its employees by cutting unpaid furlough from 11 days to six. ray suarez discusses the budget cuts and terror threats with deputy secretary of defense ashton carter. >> our effort to deal with the current budget situation, we believe, has to be driven by strategy. that is, a view of the future. terrorism is one of those things that's going to be around. >> warner: and more than 1.5 million people have fled the bloody syrian civil war. we have an on-the-ground report from the world's second largest refugee camp in jordan. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental proble
. way before i started researching him.article, i ran into a social event. there are many in washington, d.c. nikita mr. thompson, i'm stewart. i said do you think we could talk now? remember he said, no. >> how old is he? >> 58. is he from? >> from jamaica in the perish of st. elizabeth. >> how did he get to the united states? >> he moved here with his father other siblings before he moved here, his mother had come here. and two of his siblings passed away and she was upset according family members and she needed to get away. she decided to come to d.c. to and then theatives rest of her family followed her a few years later. how old was he when he came to the united states. >> he was only 19 years old. he -- he had an education in jamaica. nothing that would really united states. so he had to start from scratch and earn a g.e.d. and went to university of the district of columbia. >> who was the first person he met in the united states who made the connections and went on have with the politicians? > several people he met along the way. i don't know if i can pinpoint the first person. h
this country and to mark the 50th anniversary of the march on washington, and the good saturday afternoon to you, everyone. i am craig melvin coming live from the feet of the lincoln memorial continuing our coverage. we heard speech from civil rights and political leaders ranging from attorney general eric holder of course here and house speaker -- house minority leader nancy pelosi and the families of trayvon martin and of course martin luther king iii scheduled to join us at some point here over the next hour or so, and again right now thousands about to start retracing the steps that marchers took 50 years ago. so has peter alexander who is along the march route and let me start with you. what is the scene like right now? >> so right now we're along the route on independence avenue and you can see the police are clearing the way as they arrive here at the martin luther king memorial. we are joined by so many people who witnessed history as we wait to see those who participated in it, one of those voices is the gentleman i met today named franklin delano, no roosevelt, but williams. you
but is it just a ploy to sell books? >>> should marijuana be decriminalized. it is in washington state. >>> and i'm abby huntsman. how do people feel about men and women in power, like their bosses? we'll report how men and women see men and women in power on "the cycle" on august 19th, 2013. ♪ >>> shout out to carol king. we begin with egypt as america focuses on that $1.5 billion in aid we give egypt each year. more than 800 people are confirmed dead since wednesday. that number is expected to go higher. adding the potential for more unrest is this. hosni mubarak might be released while awaiting trial. over the weekend, 25 off-duty egyptian policemen were executed in an ambush. also, 36 prisoners were killed while in custody. there are varying accounts as to what happened there. we're going to take a two-pronged approach. first, the international implications and then the domestic, political side of it here in america. for that we have two people who know. former white house mideast adviser, ambassador mark ginsburg. for the politics of it all, dana millbank. first to you, am
on washington? >> the purpose of it was jobs. but what was behind that and what was the revelation for me was how much and everything dr. king did was really all about education. was all about education. he was locked in on that and when that group went into the white house and talked with the president, president kennedy said and this is reported by brandt, that the kind of influence you have in the black community you really ought to emphasize schools and getting your kids to do well in schools. >> i am struck mostly by how different things are now. the technology is such a you can get a flash mob to show up if you want but 1963 you get 200,000 people back to the mall and you would be below horned. organizing was remarkable and that to me -- i would like people to understand the enormity of that. >> a very short time a group of people came together because they believe in something. and they put together the most unbelievable moment in american history. >> on the march on washington to go forward but the young people who want to be journalists tuesday that they have an obligation to cov
trump speaking at the leadership >> this week on "q and a," washington post reporter nikita stewart discusses her recent front-page profile of washington see -- washington, d.c. businessman gerald washington. >> nikita stewart, as a reporter for the washington post, on july 13, you wrote a huge fees, front-page, on a man named jeffrey thompson. why? our local businessman at the center of major federal investigation and no one really knew who we was. so i basically told my editor i want to write the definitive profile of jeffrey thompson. when people want to know about him, they want -- i want them to refer back to this article. >> what we want to know about him? >> right now, he is the center of d.c. politics and some folks say he is actually at the center of d.c. all addiction basically falling apart. for years, behind-the-scenes, he had been giving to candidates. he had several contracts coming huge contracts with the city, one worth $22 million year. and no one really knew who he things came to light the011 over problems with current mayors. -- the current mayors campaign in 2010
would precipitate another crisis here in washington that no economist thinks is a good idea-- i'm assuming that they will not take that... that path. i have confidence that common sense in the end will prevail. >> woodruff: the president also fielded questions on his upcoming decision to appoint a new federal reserve chairman this fall, saying it was one of the most important decisions that remained in his presidency. and he also urged house republicans to move forward with an immigration reform bill once members return from their summer recess. >> brown: later in the program we'll have david brooks and ruth marcus respond to what the president said. between now and then: the u.s. and russia try to warm their frosty relationship; detroit struggles after declaring bankruptcy; brooks and marcus on the week's news and goats in the graveyard. but first, the other news of the day. here's kwame holman. >> holman: american government personnel left lahore, pakistan today because of a specific threat to the consulate there. the u.s. shifted non-essential staff from lahore to the capita
that changed america forever. the march on washington. august 28th, 1963. people of all races, regular people from all walks of life marching against injustice, marching to change history. a day when the voices of the movement echoed across america. >> we are of a massive moral revolution. >> how long can we be patient? we want our freedom and we want it now. >> a call to action and a call for peace. the words that inspired a people, a nation, and the entire world. >> free at last, free at last, thank god almighty we are free at last. >> tonight, a special two-hour edition of "politicsnation." the march on washington. the dream continues. >> good evening. i'm al sharpton live from the lincoln memorial here on the national mall. 50 years ago hundreds of thousands of people stood where i am. right now watching history. millions more watching at home seeing the leaders of the civil rights movement, call for justice and equality. powerful speeches and powerful music from singers like lahalia jackson, bob dylan. tonight we'll hear those voices. we'll also hear from congressman john lewis. i talk t
. >> brown: and we continue our look at the legacy of the march on washington 50 years on. tonight, reflections on the challenges ahead for martin luther king's vision for a multi-racial democracy. >> 40% of whites don't have friends outside of their own race. so in some ways we're still as segregated as we were 50 years ago and i think that king would be very concerned about that. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the united states worked today to firm up the intelligence behind claims that syria used chemical weapons and to win support fo
comments from the ambassador there. the washington side from you if we stop giving aid to egypt, then, yes, vladimir putin might come in. then we lose a key ally or change a key ally in that important region. so what has washington got to consider here? >> well, the ambassador was talking about how it all is naval gazing. that, of course, is the great national past time here in the capital. i've just left today's white house briefing that was dominated by that very question of what will happen to that aid. as you would expect, they're making no commitment one way or the other. found many ways to deflect that over the hour. the good news, perhaps, is that congress is still out of session for another few weeks, so no decision actually needs to be made. they won't be forcing anybody's hand. they can wait and see how things develop here. there was no appetite for suspending aid before this most recent crackdown, as we saw on the hill before they left town. obviously, this could change. it seems to me that the administration is saying, all right, we've got a little breathing room, not in terms
extends beyond the border of washington state into british columbia. it's one of the largest and most biologically rich inland seas in the world. jeremiah julius is a fisherman from the lummi tribal community. the whole landscape is sacred to us. there's not much contaminant free lands left in the united states. this is one of them. >> reporter: for hundreds of generations, his tribe has relied on the halibut, salmon and crab that thrive in these waters. >> fishing is who we are. fishing is our culture. and to us, culture is fish. it's just in our blood. >> reporter: but there's a storm brewing at cherry point, just north of bellingham, washington. this is where s.s.a. marine wants to build the largest coal export terminal in north america. nearly 500 ships would travel these waters every year, carrying coal to the other side of the pacific. asia consumes more coal than rest of the world combined. in the next three years, countries there are expected to double the amount of coal they import today. that soaring demand spells opportunity for u.s. companies, according to bob waters, dire
with a predictably defensive editorial by mayor michael bloomberg in the "washington post" in which the mayor took turns defending stop and fricsk and attacking the "washington post," itself, and others were criticizing the practice saying "the men and women who protect our city from criminals and terrorists deserve better than to have their integrity impugned in a courtroom or a newspaper especially when the facts are so clearly on their side." even today speaking at a press conference, touting the largest gun seizure in new york history, both men looked to play up the role of stop and frisk in getting guns off the street. >> wiretap conversations from this investigation show that one of the gun traffickers' biggest concerns was stop, question, frisk. >> campbell didn't want to risk it being found by new york police and is heard saying, "yeah. i'm in charlotte now. i can't take them to my house, to my side of town, in brownsville. we got, like, watchamacallit, stop and frisk. >> mayor bloomberg and commissioner kelly doubling down and repeating the same statements again and again over stop and fr
cannot even get traction in washington talking about poverty. president barack obama and the members of congress, both the left and the right -- everybody has to it knowledge that they spend so much more time in washington talking about the middle class, they are obsessed, but we cannot get a conversation about poverty. why is that? >> you said it. it is a political sort of poll tested way to try to get that extra are centage point in terms of public opinion. that priorgs political leaders did, and certainly our civil rights leaders did, was they went against public opinion. they really said this is the morally right inc. to do, and we need to move the country in that direction. unfortunately, that type of leadership we don't see today. this president campaigned on raising the minimum wage. at one point, he was for raising it to even a higher level than he has suggested of late that he wants to raise it to. why is he negotiating against himself? why can't politicians understand that americans are hurting, that we need a living wage, not a minimum wage? >> that is really an important
right around 3:00 this afternoon on the steps of the u.s. capitol in washington. everybody out! everybody out! time to go! you don't have to go home but you got to live the heck out of here. yes, there was a mass exodus out of washington today as the house of representative s officially adjourned for their august recess this afternoon. and like teenagers on the last day of school, members of congress just bolted for the exits today. once the final bell rang, bye-bye, see you in a month. washington is now heading off for its summer vacation. their august recess. what do you do when you're heading off for vacation? well, don't you tend to take care of a few last-minute things? maybe you run the dishwasher one last time. you take out the trash. you do all of these things in order to put your house in order. before you leave. and you do that so that you're not faced with a big, stinky mess when you get back home. that's what people do when they're heading out for vacation. turns out washington did the same thing. now, contrary to what you may have heard, they actually did get some
with a lawsuit claiming trump university is making false promise autos remembering the march on washington. nearly 50 years later two residents share stories and yes honey? dad told me that cheerios is good for your heart, is that true? says here that cheerios has whole grain oats that can help remove some cholesterol, and that's heart healthy. [ dad ] jan? ♪ >>> secretary of state kerry delivered the obama administration's sharpest condemnation yet to last week's apparent chemical attack in syria, blaming the assad regime for at tack saying the administration will hold the syrian government accountable. syria rejected the regime's denial of responsibility. >> make no mistake. president obama believe there's must be a a.ktibility for those who would use the world's most heinous weapons against the world's most vulnerable people. nothing todz is more serious, nudging is receiving more serious scrutiny. >> kerry says the u.s. is now conferring with world leaders about a appropriate response. >>> a second teenager is in custody for the fatal beating of an 88-year-old world war ii veteran. h
's bring in former state department spokesman p.j. crowley and michael crowley and washington post diplomatic correspondent ann biernan. thank you all for being here. p.j., i want to start with you and this announcement by president obama that washington is canceling the joint military operations. how significant is that decision? does it carry any weight whatsoever? >> i'm sure it will be heard loud and clear by the egyptian military. how they respond to that, we'll have to see. i think the administration's challenge right now is not only what message it sends to the egyptian military, of course the president again decided not to tinker with the existing military assistance, but also what message do you send to the muslim brotherhood. do they have a mounting list of grievances. of course, the policy objective is to return to inclusive democracy. the real challenge over the next several weeks is how do you entice the muslim brotherhood that's been the victim of a coup and violence back into the political process. the end result is stronger than what was overthrown six months ago. >
:57, the least productive employees in america left washington for five weeks holiday. nice work if you can get it. ♪ >> the stakes couldn't be higher. >> there's a gone campaigning side outside the oval office. >> if i had poll numbers as low as his. >> how about a grand bargain for middle class jobs. >> no jobs bill, no budget bill. the threat of shutting down government. >> the one threatening to shut down the government is the president. >> majority leader. >> sit down and shut up, okay? >> 40 meaningless votes to repeal obama care. >> finally defund obama care. >> you're delivering no meaningful information. >> you're going to go back to your districts and explain. >> it's an aimless congress falling into chaos. >> it's pathetic. >> we're just slightly ahead of genghis kahn apartment communist party in popularity. >> i'm not the least bit concerned about what some might wand to describe as perception. >> i've run my last campaign. i don't need to spin. >> i'm sure the august recess will have our members in a better mood when they come back. ♪ ♪ holiday road, oh >>> ah, yes, it is tha
at downtown d.c. just off the national mall commemorating the march on washington for jobs and freedom led by martin luther king jr. on august 28, 1963. the anniversary itself is wednesday when another gathering is planned and president obama will be here. we'll have live coverage on c-span and c-span radio of that appearance. if you missed any of the rally that just ended we'll show you ighlights from that rally. >> for those of us who are from the south, 50 years ago we received our marching orders hen the prophet dr. king jr. quoted the prophet isiah, that have a dream. this is our hope. this is the faith that we go back to the south with. those are our marching orders. this is the faith that we go back to the south with. yes, the south where some are still trying to fight the civil war. yes, the south. where we are witnessing this vicious attack on voting rights and the blatant voter suppression by one particular political party. es, the south where young boys can't walk the street of his father's neighborhood without eing profiled, confronted, stalked, and finally murdered. watched ov
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 415 (some duplicates have been removed)